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Programming Massively Parallel Processors: A Hands-on Approachl


At NVIDIA, Kirk led graphics-technology development for some of today's most popular consumer-entertainment platforms, playing a key role in providing mass-market graphics capabilities previously available only on workstations costing hundreds of thousands of dollars. For his role in bringing high-performance graphics to personal computers, Kirk received the 2002 Computer Graphics Achievement Award from the Association for Computing Machinery and the Special Interest Group on Graphics and Interactive Technology (ACM SIGGRAPH) and, in 2006, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest professional distinctions for engineers. Kirk holds 50 patents and patent applications relating to graphics design and has published more than 50 articles on graphics technology, won several best-paper awards, and edited the book Graphics Gems III. A technological "evangelist" who cares deeply about education, he has supported new curriculum initiatives at Caltech and has been a frequent university lecturer and conference keynote speaker worldwide.Affiliations and ExpertiseNVIDIA FellowIzzat El HajjIzzat El Hajj is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the American University of Beirut. His research interests are in application acceleration and programming support for emerging parallel processors and memory technologies, with a particular interest in GPUs and processing-in-memory. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a recipient of the Dan Vivoli Endowed Fellowship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Distinguished Graduate Award at the American University of Beirut.Affiliations and ExpertiseAssistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, American University of Beirut, LebanonRatings and ReviewsWrite a review




Programming Massively Parallel Processors: A Hands-on Approachl


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Programming Massively Parallel Processors: A Hands-on Approach, Second Edition, teaches students how to program massively parallel processors. It offers a detailed discussion of various techniques for constructing parallel programs. Case studies are used to demonstrate the development process, which begins with computational thinking and ends with effective and efficient parallel programs.


This guide shows both student and professional alike the basic concepts of parallel programming and GPU architecture. Topics of performance, floating-point format, parallel patterns, and dynamic parallelism are covered in depth. This revised edition contains more parallel programming examples, commonly-used libraries such as Thrust, and explanations of the latest tools. It also provides new coverage of CUDA 5.0, improved performance, enhanced development tools, increased hardware support, and more; increased coverage of related technology, OpenCL and new material on algorithm patterns, GPU clusters, host programming, and data parallelism; and two new case studies (on MRI reconstruction and molecular visualization) that explore the latest applications of CUDA and GPUs for scientific research and high-performance computing.


The textbook, which is 256 pages, is the first aimed at teaching advanced students and professionals the basic concepts of parallel programming and GPU architectures. Published by Morgan-Kauffman, it explores various techniques for constructing parallel programs and reviews numerous case studies.


With conventional CPU-based computing no longer scaling in performance and the world's computational challenges increasing in complexity, the need for massively parallel processing has never been greater. GPUs have hundreds of cores capable of delivering transformative performance increases across a wide range of computational challenges. The rise of these multi-core architectures has raised the need to teach advanced programmers a new and essential skill: how to program massively parallel processors.


"I'd like to personally congratulate David and Wen-mei for writing this landmark book and enabling generations of student programmers to understand and exploit the massively parallel architecture of GPUs," said Bill Dally, chief scientist at NVIDIA and former chairman of Stanford University's computer science department. "As a former professor, I have seen firsthand how seminal texts like this can transform a field. I look forward to seeing the transformation of computing as students are inspired and guided to master GPU computing by this book."


First and only text that teaches how to program within a massively parallel environment Portions of the NVIDIA-provided content have been part of the curriculum at 300 universities worldwide Drafts of sections of the book have been tested and taught by Kirk at the University of Illinois Book utilizes OpenCL(TM) and CUDA(TM) C, the NVIDIA(R) parallel computing language developed specifically for massively parallel environments


Programming Massively Parallel Processors: A Hands-on Approach, Third Edition shows both student and professional alike the basic concepts of parallel programming and GPU architecture, exploring, in detail, various techniques for constructing parallel programs.Case studies demonstrate the development process, detailing computational thinking and ending with effective and efficient parallel programs. Topics of performance, floating-point format, parallel patterns, and dynamic parallelism are covered in-depth.For this new edition, the authors have updated their coverage of CUDA, including coverage of newer libraries, such as CuDNN, moved content that has become less important to appendices, added two new chapters on parallel patterns, and updated case studies to reflect current industry practices.


Programming Massively Parallel Processors: A Hands-on Approach shows both student and professional alike the basic concepts of parallel programming and GPU architecture. Various techniques for constructing parallel programs are explored in detail. Case studies demonstrate the development process, which begins with computational thinking and ends with effective and efficient parallel programs. Topics of performance, floating-point format, parallel patterns, and dynamic parallelism are covered in depth.


This best-selling guide to CUDA and GPU parallel programming has been revised with more parallel programming examples, commonly-used libraries such as Thrust, and explanations of the latest tools. With these improvements, the book retains its concise, intuitive, practical approach based on years of road-testing in the authors' own parallel computing courses.


The aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge and hands-on experience in developing applications software for processors with massively parallel computing resources. In general, we refer to a processor as massively parallel if it has the ability to complete more than 64 arithmetic operations per clock cycle. Today NVIDIA processors already exhibit this capability. Processors from Intel, AMD, and IBM will begin to qualify as massively parallel in the next several years. Effectively programming these processors will require in-depth knowledge about parallel programming principles, as well as the parallelism models, communication models, and resource limitations of these processors. The target audiences of the course are students who want to develop exciting applications for these processors, as well as those who want to develop programming tools and future implementations for these processors.


We will be using NVIDIA processors and the CUDA programming tools in the lab section of the course. Many have reported success in performing non-graphics parallel computation as well as traditional graphics rendering computation on these processors. You will go through structured programming assignments before being turned loose on the final project. Each programming assignment will involve successively more sophisticated programming skills. The final project will be of your own design, with the requirement that the project must involve a demanding application such as mathematics- or physics-intensive simulation or other data-intensive computation, followed by some form of visualization and display of results.


This is a course in programming massively parallel processors for general computation. We are fortunate to have the support and presence of David Kirk, the Chief Scientist of NVIDIA and one of the main driving forces behind the new NVIDIA CUDA technology. Building on architecture knowledge from ECE 411, and general C programming knowledge, we will expose you to the tools and techniques you will need to attack a real-world application for the final project. The final projects will be supported by some real application groups at UIUC and around the country, such as biomedical imaging and physical simulation.


The goal of COMP 422/534 is to introduce you to the foundations ofparallel computing including the principles of parallel algorithmdesign, analytical modeling of parallel programs, programming models for shared- and distributed-memory systems,parallel computer architectures, along with numerical andnon-numerical algorithms for parallel systems. The course willinclude material on emerging multicore hardware, shared-memory programming models, message passing programming modelsused for cluster computing, data-parallel programming modelsfor GPUs, and problem-solving on large-scale clusters using MapReduce. A key aim of the course is for you to gain a hands-on knowledge of the fundamentals of parallel programming by writing efficient parallelprograms using some of the programming models that you learn inclass.


In the 'many-core era' that happens now, additional transistors are used not to speed up serial code paths, but to offer multiple execution engines ('cores') per processor. This changes every desktop-, server-, or even mobile system into a parallel computer. The exploitation of additional transistors is therefore now the responsibility of software, which makes parallel programming a mandatory approach for all software with scalability demands.


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